?

Log in

Bob's Daily Thoughts
 
[Most Recent Entries] [Calendar View] [Friends]

Below are the 20 most recent journal entries recorded in recoverythought's LiveJournal:

[ << Previous 20 ]
Thursday, August 25th, 2016
6:06 am
Releasing Guilt - Permission to Forgive Ourselves
Dwelling in guilt is like living your life with an anchor tied to your ankles dragging you down.

Learning to accept the things that we perceive as wrong can be a difficult task for many of us. Often we have been brought up to accept that it is normal to feel guilty about our actions and that by doing so we will make everything seem alright within ourselves. Even though we might feel that we have a reason to make up for the choices we have made, it is much more important for us to learn how to deal with them in a healthy and positive way, such as through forgiveness and understanding.

When we can look back at our past and really assess what has happened, we begin to realize that there are many dimensions to our actions. While feeling guilty might assuage our feelings at first, it is really only a short-term solution. It is all too ironic that being hard on ourselves is the easy way out. If we truly are able to gaze upon our lives through the lens of compassion, however, we will be able to see that there is much more to what we do and have done than we realize. Perhaps we were simply trying to protect ourselves or others and did the best we could at the time, or maybe we thought we had no other recourse and chose a solution in the heat of the moment. Once we can understand that dwelling in our negative feelings will only make us feel worse, we will come to recognize that it is really only through forgiving ourselves that we can transform our feelings and truly heal any resentment we have about our past.

Giving ourselves permission to feel at peace with our past actions is one of the most positive steps we can take toward living a life free from regrets, disappointments, and guilt. The more we are able to remind ourselves that the true path to a peaceful mind and heart is through acceptance of every part of our lives and actions, the more harmony and inner joy we will experience in all aspects of our lives.


By Madisyn Taylor of The Daily OM
Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016
4:48 am
Big Book (Alcoholics Anonymous) PP 86-88
On awakening let us think about the twenty-four hours ahead. We consider our plans for the day. Be¬ fore we begin, we ask God to direct our thinking, especially asking that it be divorced from self-pity, dishonest or self-seeking motives. Under these condi¬tions we can employ our mental faculties with as¬surance, for after all God gave us brains to use. Our thought-life will be placed on a much higher plane when our thinking is cleared of wrong motives.

In thinking about our day we may face indecision. We may not be able to determine which course to take. Here we ask God for inspiration, an intuitive thought or a decision. We relax and take it easy. We don’t struggle. We are often surprised how the right answers come after we have tried this for a while.

What used to be the hunch or the occasional inspira¬tion gradually becomes a working part of the mind. Being still inexperienced and having just made con¬scious contact with God, it is not probable that we are going to be inspired at all times. We might pay for this presumption in all sorts of absurd actions and ideas. Nevertheless, we find that our thinking will, as time passes, be more and more on the plane of in¬spiration. We come to rely upon it.

We usually conclude the period of meditation with a prayer that we be shown all through the day what our next step is to be, that we be given whatever we need to take care of such problems. We ask especially for freedom from self-will, and are careful to make no request for ourselves only. We may ask for ourselves, however, if others will be helped. We are careful never to pray for our own selfish ends. Many of us have wasted a lot of time doing that and it doesn’t work. You can easily see why.

If circumstances warrant, we ask our wives or friends to join us in morning meditation. If we belong to a religious denomination which requires a definite morning devotion, we attend to that also. If not mem¬bers of religious bodies, we sometimes select and memorize a few set prayers which emphasize the principles we have been discussing. There are many helpful books also. Suggestions about these may be obtained from one’s priest, minister, or rabbi. Be quick to see where religious people are right. Make use of what they offer.

As we go through the day we pause, when agitated or doubtful, and ask for the right thought or action. We constantly remind ourselves we are no longer running the show, humbly saying to ourselves many times each day “Thy will be done.’’ We are then in much less danger of excitement, fear, anger, worry, self-pity, or foolish decisions. We become much more efficient. We do not tire so easily, for we are not burning up energy foolishly as we did when we were trying to arrange life to suit ourselves.

It works—it really does.

We alcoholics are undisciplined. So we let God discipline us in the simple way we have just outlined.
Monday, August 22nd, 2016
5:09 am
11 Questions
The 11 Questions To Ask Yourself When You Feel Uninspired

Did you know 70 per cent of us hate our jobs? Less than one third of employees are engaged at work. And those who have just recently joined the workforce — "disenchanted millennials," they've been called — are particularly at risk. Research from 2014 found millennials are less likely to say they "have the opportunity to do what they do best" at work, and many are working in jobs that aren't aligned with their talents or strengths.

Maybe this sounds familiar. Maybe you're struggling to find out what it is you care most about. Maybe you feel as if your passion, excitement, and zest for life are slipping away. You're not alone.

If you've been feeling exhausted and depleted all the time, there's hope. Maybe you're not just tired but uninspired.
These questions can help you pinpoint exactly what it is that inspires you. If you decide to, you can even use these answers to help craft a side hustle in your free time — to make more money, create more freedom, and attract an unlimited amount of opportunities down the line.

1. If money were no object, what would I do all day?
Believe it or not, even rich people need to work to stay stimulated (just look at Oprah Winfrey and Richard Branson). They just do what they want to do. Now that's freedom! What would you do in this same position? Would you write, teach scuba diving, give dating advice? Work that you would do for free strongly implies what activities you enjoy most and what probably comes pretty easily to you.
Who we admire is a huge indicator of who we secretly would like to become.

2. If I could be anyone for a week, who would it be?
Who we admire is a huge indicator of who we secretly would like to become. Do you look up to Abby Wambach, Abraham Lincoln, Victoria Beckham, Matt Lauer, Erin Burnett? Review who you obsess over — it's a bright, shining clue.

3. What conversation topic can I get lost in for hours?
Real estate, investing, travel, animals, cars, fashion, fitness? Your most dominant chat topics are a vital sign of what excites you!

4. If I walk into a bookstore, which section am I drawn to?
This also applies to an Amazon search or even your preference for websites and blogs. What types of information do you most love to consume? What sites have your bookmarked? Which types of writers sit on your bookshelf? At this point, some solid dots might already be connecting for you. Embrace this!

5. Who do I love to spend time with and why?
Who's part of your "tribe"? Do you like analytical thinkers, creative people, entrepreneurs, artists? Often we are drawn to people like us and we are usually a reflection of our peer group. Who are your preferred friends — the ones who most energize you?

6. If you asked my partner/mother/best friend what I'm best at doing, what would they say?
Would there be a common thread throughout the answers? Are you a great motivator? An incredible listener? An organizer? A storyteller? A go-getter in business? An explorer? Let people who you love and trust tell you who you are. It's an eye-opening and fun experiment — and a confidence boost.

7. Who was I as a kid?
Let your inner child (who never leaves you!) resurface in your thoughts. Look at a childhood photo of yourself. If you were true to this person, what would you be doing to make sure you don't let him or her down? Trust me, the little you is begging to be heard and can be called to attention in an instant.

8. What do people come to me for?
Resume advice, helping to fix things at home, interior design tips? This can point you toward the gifts and talents that you might not recognize in yourself. Derek Sivers says it best, "What's easy for you is amazing to others."

9. What do I feel least insecure about?
Human beings are funny. We are inordinately hard on ourselves. We're quick to point out our flaws and have a much harder time recognizing our skills. I once coached a very high-achieving CEO, and getting her to share her leadership strengths with me was like pulling teeth.
If this sounds like you, instead of thinking which qualities you most value in yourself, ask, "What parts of me do I dislike the least?" Allow yourself to remember past accomplishments or times where you've really helped others. Let the parts of you that you might secretly feel proud of truly shine.

10. What's pure and simple fun for me?
Ain't nothin' like a consistent hobby that can reveal an awesome hustle idea. The only difference between a hustle and a hobby is that a hustle pays — meaning it provides a service for others. Take note — if you love to paint as a hobby purely for your own pleasure, great! That might not be a hustle idea. But if you'd also love to paint for other people and have your work in other people's homes/offices/beach houses ... you may just be sitting on a jackpot!
I have a friend who loves Krav Maga and teaches it to families and another friend who adores planning parties for her entrepreneurial friends. Bingo! They love the work they are doing, they are good at it, and they can be paid for it. What do you love to do that you are really good at and can be paid for?

11. If I had to write a book, what would it be about?
Don't panic — you don't have to write one! But if you did, what might it be about? I love asking people this random question. I hear so many answers from sailing to writing vegan recipes to helping people with PTSD heal through music. I just wrote a book on my passion: helping people make the impact they were born to make via the art of a side hustle.

The take-away
There is nothing more important than becoming who you are here to be. With the distractions of daily life, we often do not take time to look within and understand who it is that we really are. The time and courage taken to give life to the real you is your only true obligation to yourself.

When we live an inspired life, we live a joyful life. It is impossible not to. When we become who we really are, our life can transform, and the results are often bigger than we imagine, bigger than us. We have more confidence. We create more abundance. Our connection to the world is solidified. And the legacy, the ripple effect of us living a life we love, has an endless contribution on the lives of others. What is more important than that?

By Susie Moore
Saturday, August 20th, 2016
5:26 am
Centering and Expressing
Expressing ourselves honestly in any relationship is essential to our well-being.

When we are in a relationship where we feel listened to and understood, we count ourselves lucky because we know how rare that experience is. We reserve our most intimate selves for the people who, along with us, co-create an open space where we feel free to express ourselves and listen without judgment. These relationships, which thrive on open communication, can mean the difference between existential loneliness and a deep sense of belonging. We all long to feel heard, understood, and loved, and clear communication makes this possible.

Sometimes problems arise in the process of expressing how we feel, but it is always worth it to do the work. Even in our less intimate relationships, expressing ourselves honestly is essential to our sense of well-being. Whether at home with family or in the outside world, successful communication requires some forethought; otherwise we risk blundering through our relationships like the proverbial bull in a china shop. However, too much forethought can stifle us or cause us to pad our words so extremely that we end up saying nothing at all or confusing the matter further. The good news is that there are many methods that can come to our rescue, from meditation to visualization to journaling.

If the person we need to communicate with is open to sitting in meditation together for a set period of time before speaking, this can be invaluable. When we are calm and centered, we can count on ourselves to speak and respond truthfully. We can also meditate on our own time and then practice what we need to say. A visualization in which we sit with the person and lovingly exchange a few words can also be a great precedent to an actual conversation. If writing comes easily, we can write out what we need to say; it may take several drafts, but we will eventually find the words. The key is to find ways to center ourselves so that we communicate meaningfully, lovingly, and wisely. In this way, we honor our companions and create relationships in which there is a genuine sense of understanding and respect.

By Madisyn Taylor of The Daily OM
Friday, August 19th, 2016
5:09 am
Asking For Our Turn
Karen’s father never listened to her. When her college friend, Iris, came home for Thanksgiving to meet her family, Karen’s father began to drift away from their conversation as he always did, dismissing both of them. But Iris immediately said, “Mr. Hollins, we’re here, please.” This awkward call from Iris broke a dark custom between Karen and her father. After a brief and difficult silence, Karen’s father said, “Oh, sorry. Yes, where were we?”

Later, Iris said to Karen, “It hurt me to see you so disregarded. Why can’t you ask for your turn? He probably won’t change, but you don’t have to muffle yourself.” It had never occurred to Karen to say a word. 


It’s hard to remember that we are filled with light, and that we have choices. To emanate our light in the presence of others is a struggle that everyone faces, more than once. Unlike animals, we as humans can muffle our light and do so every time we let others block us from being who we are. We do this to ourselves each time we don’t ask for our turn: to come out from behind our masks, to speak our truth, and to honestly share our feelings. 


Some people are so blocked from their light that they can’t bear the light of others nearby, as it painfully reminds them of the absence of their own connection to the Truth of the Universe. They become light-mufflers rather than light-seekers. In the face of all this, we’re asked to grow toward the light the way trees and plants do. Each branch grows toward whatever opening is available. Branches grow around each other and through each other. Some branches grow down before growing up. Some grow sideways, while some twist through the smallest openings. But together, all the branches form a majestic, unrepeatable latticework of trees. Growing toward the light is asking for our turn.

A Question to Walk With: Describe a time when you needed to ask for your turn. Did you do so or not? If so, what made that possible? If not, what kept you from asking for your turn? How has this experience affected the way you share what you truly experience?

From – Mark Nepo
Thursday, August 18th, 2016
1:56 am
Puppies
A farmer had some puppies he needed to sell. He painted a sign advertising the 4 pups. And set about nailing it to a post on the edge of his yard. As he was driving the last nail into the post, he felt a tug on his overalls. He looked down into the eyes of a little boy.
"Mister," he said, "I want to buy one of your puppies."

"Well," said the farmer, as he rubbed the sweat off the back of his neck, "These puppies come from fine parents and cost a good deal of money."

The boy dropped his head for a moment. Then reaching deep into his pocket, he pulled out a handful of change and held it up to the farmer. "I've got thirty-nine cents. Is that enough to take a look?"

"Sure," said the farmer. And with that he let out a whistle. Here, Dolly!" he called. Out from the doghouse and down the ramp ran Dolly; followed by four little balls of fur. The little boy pressed his face against the chain link fence. His eyes danced with delight. As the dogs made their way to the fence, the little boy noticed something else stirring inside the doghouse. Slowly another little ball appeared, this one noticeably smaller. Down the ramp it slid. Then in a somewhat awkward manner, the little pup began hobbling toward the others, doing its best to catch up....

"I want that one," the little boy said, pointing to the runt.

The farmer knelt down at the boy's side and said, "Son, you don't want that puppy. He will never be able to run and play with you like these other dogs would.

"With that, the little boy stepped back from the fence, reached down, and began rolling up one leg of his trousers. In doing so he revealed a steel brace running down both sides of his leg attaching itself to a specially made shoe. Looking back up at the farmer, he said, "You see sir, I don't run too well myself, and he will need someone who understands.

"With tears in his eyes, the farmer reached down and picked up the little pup. Holding it carefully he handed it to the little boy.

"How much?" asked the little boy.

"No charge," answered the farmer. "There's no charge for love."
Wednesday, August 17th, 2016
4:43 am
Saint Or Sinner?
Which is our true person? Are we really saints with big hearts, or petty, spiteful persons?

We are both saints and sinners, since goodness and selfishness both flow through us. Sometimes in the face of a slight, insult, or even positive attack and injustice, we react with patience, understanding, and forgiveness. However, sometimes we meet pettiness it in kind, with spite.

We don’t know the reason; that’s part of the mystery of human freedom. Certain factors obviously play in; for example, if we are in a good inner-space when we are ignored, slighted, or unfairly treated, we are more prone to react with patience and understanding, with a big heart. Conversely, if we are tired, pressured, and feeling unloved and unappreciated, we are more likely to react negatively, and return spite for spite.

Be that as it may, ultimately there’s deeper reality at work in all of this, beyond our emotional well being on a given day. How we react to a situation, with grace or spite, for the most part depends upon something else.

The Church Fathers had a concept and name for this. They believed that each of us has two souls, a big soul and a petty soul, and how we react to any situation depends largely upon which soul we are thinking with and acting out of at that moment. Thus, if I meet an insult or an injury with my big soul, I am more likely to meet it with patience, understanding, and forgiveness. Conversely, if I meet an insult or a hurt while operating out of my petty soul, I am more likely to respond in kind, with pettiness, coldness, and spite.

And, for the Church Fathers, both of these souls are inside us and both are real; we’re both big-hearted and petty, saint and sinner. The challenge is to operate more out of our big soul than our petty one.

The saint and sinner inside us are not separate entities. Rather the saint in us, the big soul, is not only our true self, it’s our only self. The sinner in us, the petty soul, is not a separate person or separate moral force doing perpetual battle with the saint, it’s simply the wounded part of the saint, that part of the saint that’s been cursed and never properly blessed.
And our wounded self shouldn’t be demonized and cursed again. Rather it needs to be befriended and blessed – and then it will cease being petty and spiteful in the face of adversity.

Fr Ron Rolheiser, OMI

The Best we can ever hope to be is Human! RBM
Sunday, August 14th, 2016
12:30 am
Souls Chained To Things Beyond Us
We suffer through obsessions of all kinds.

Memories, regrets, hurts, intuitions, nostalgia, and daydreams of all sorts, are forever impaling themselves inside of us and leaving us deeply restless. Karl Jung once said that energy isn’t always friendly. Whenever we have a heartache, a regret, or an obsession that spoils our day and leaves us too restless to sleep at night we experience what he meant.

This is both good and bad: Some of the things we are chained to produce pain and restlessness in ways that rob us of sunshine, freedom, and sleep. Often, when we are restless, the thoughts and feelings that have invaded us are unwanted. We wish we could be free of them in order to enjoy our lives, without these thoughts and feelings roaming around inside of us like ghosts inside a haunted house. But, painful as this can be, we really wouldn’t want the opposite.

If we could ever be content simply with the pleasures contained in a given moment, like a contented animal munching grass in the sun, we would, by that same token, reduce ourselves from human to animal. What makes our souls different from the souls of animals is precisely the fact that our souls are infinite in their depth, infinite in their yearnings, and therefore infinite too in the realities to which they are chained. Our restlessness is, in fact, a sign of our humanity.
Sometimes of course this wears us down and we get to so weary and tired that we want only to numb ourselves against those things that over-stimulate our souls from beyond. This numbing ourselves to depth can be healthy for a while, as a convalescent space, but in the end we need to be haunted from beyond. The ghosts that haunt us bring with them depth, spirit, and meaning.

Morris West tells us that we are always haunted by things beyond us, but he adds: “I am sure that it is in this domain of our daily dreaming that the Holy Spirit establishes his own communion with us. This is how the gift is given which we call grace: the sudden illumination, the sharp regret that leads to penitence or forgiveness, the opening of the heart to the risk of love.”

Fr Ron Rolheiser, OMI
Saturday, August 13th, 2016
4:32 am
Learning To Trust Divine Guidance
Keeping an open mind is the most important step when learning to listen to divine guidance.

Anyone who has asked for divine guidance knows that it can be challenging to trust it when it comes. This is because divine guidance comes in many forms and it is sometimes hard to locate it. We aren’t sure if we are meant to trust our thoughts, our feelings, our dreams, or our intuitions to be the carriers of divine wisdom. We are not sure if advice from a friend is the form in which the guidance has come into the world, or if our own opinion is the source of wisdom we need to take seriously. The ability to sort all this out comes with trial and error, and the best way to learn to recognize divine guidance is to engage in the process of asking and receiving.

Sometimes when we ask for guidance, we already have a sense of what we want to hear. At such times, receiving guidance can be difficult, because we don’t want to hear anything that appears to be in opposition to our desire. Therefore, one of the most important qualities we need to cultivate if we are to receive guidance is an open mind. It helps to acknowledge what we want, and then to symbolically set it aside, making room for whatever wisdom comes through to us.

Cultivating an active relationship with the divine is the essential ingredient to being able to receive and trust guidance when it comes our way. We can make a daily practice of this by using a set of runes, a deck of cards, or a pendulum. We can also use our journals, developing a relationship with the divine through the written word. As we request and receive guidance, we might take notes on our experiences. Over time we will begin to recognize when we were able to hear correctly and when we were not. In this way, we will gradually attune ourselves to our particular relationship with the divine. Begin to trust the guidance you are receiving and soon you will find it flowing with ease.

By Madisyn Taylor of The Daily OM
Friday, August 12th, 2016
5:13 am
The 2nd Half of Step 1
1. Lack of Prayer
2. Prayer without listening
3. Discontinuing spiritual practices
4. Lack of trust of God
5. Lack of trust of People
6. Compulsive blocking contact with God
7. Dishonesty
8. Defensiveness
9. Refusing to ask for help
10. Inability to receive support
11. Loneliness
12. Isolation
13. Disconnection from significant people
14. De-socialization
15. Compromise values
16. Loss of direction
17. Fears & doubts
18. Loss of meaning
19. Emptiness
20. Feeling unlovable
21. Inability to give or receive forgiveness
22. Need to prove self
23. Unbalanced lifestyle
24. Reduced creativity
25. Low self-esteem
26. Sense of worthlessness
27. Arrogance
28. Feeling trapped
29. Distorted view of self/others
30. Unconscious commitment to addiction



31. Attitude – negative, pessimistic, violent
32. Guilt and shame
33. Boredom
34. Need for stimulation
35. Can’t enjoy life
36. Broken promises
37. Fragility
38. Helplessness
39. Sense of failure
40. Rigidity
41. Anger & resentments
42. Hostility
43. Cynicism
44. Righteousness
45. Boundary problems
46. Unhealthy sexuality
47. Intolerance
48. Perfectionism
49. Grief & loss
50. Not taking responsibility for hurts caused others
51. Assigning negative characteristics to God
52. Relationship with God is all intellectual
53. Compulsive religious practices
54. God’s presence seems fuzzy/vague
55. Lack of gratitude
56. Strained relationships
57. Disconnected from feelings
58. Persistent remorse
59. Lack of self-care

Bob Martin
Thursday, August 11th, 2016
6:30 am
AA Tradition Three
Tradition Three states, “The only requirement for A.A. membership is a desire to stop drinking.” This is restated in the AA Preamble provides, in part, “The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for AA membership...”

An interesting incident from early A.A. history is told in the 12 X 12, in connection with the discussion of Tradition Three, on pages 141-42, “A newcomer appeared at one of these [early] groups, knocked on the door and asked to be let in. He talked frankly with group’s oldest member. He soon proved that his was a desperate case, and that above all he wanted to get well. ‘But,’ he asked, ‘will you let me join your group? Since I am the victim of another addiction even worse stigmatized than alcoholism, you may not want me among you. Or will you?’ There was the dilemma. What should the group do? The oldest member summoned two others, and in confidence laid the explosive facts in their laps. Said he, ‘Well, what about it? If we turn this man away, he’ll soon die. If we allow him in, only God knows what trouble he’ll brew... At first the elders could look only at the objections. ‘We deal,’ they said, ‘with alcoholics only. Shouldn’t we sacrifice this one for the sake of the many?’ So went the discussion while the newcomer’s fate hung in the balance. Then one spoke in a very different voice, ‘What we are really afraid of,’ he said, ‘is our reputation. We are much more afraid of what people might say than the trouble this strange alcoholic might bring. As we’ve been talking, five short words have been running through my mind. Something keeps repeating to me, “What would the Master do?”’ Not another word was said. What more indeed could be said? Overjoyed, the newcomer plunged into Twelfth Step work. Tirelessly he laid A.A.’s message before scores of people. Since this was a very early group, those scores have since multiplied into thousands. Never did he trouble anyone with his other difficulty.”

Prayer: God, thank you for making Your love and the A.A. solution so readily available to me.


From Roger Baron
Wednesday, August 10th, 2016
6:12 am
Six Short Stories
{1} Once all villagers decided to pray for rain, on the day of prayer all the people gathered, but only one boy came with an umbrella.
 That's FAITH



{2} When you throw a baby in the air, she laughs because she knows you will catch her.
 That's TRUST



{3} Every night we go to bed, without any assurance of being alive the next morning but still we set the alarms to wake up.
 That's HOPE



{4} We plan big things for tomorrow in spite of zero knowledge of the future.
 That's CONFIDENCE



{5} We see the world suffering, but still we get married and have children.
 That's LOVE



{6} On an old man's shirt was written a sentence 'I am not 91 years old ... I am sweet 16 with 75 years’ experience.
That's ATTITUDE



Have a good week and live your life like the six short stories!

 May you always have love to share, health to spare & friends who care!
Tuesday, August 9th, 2016
6:14 am
Moris and His New Car
The story is told of Morris, a Russian man, who saved his rubles for twenty years to buy a new car. After choosing the model and options he wants, he's not the least bit surprised or even concerned to learn that it will take two years for the new car to be delivered. He thanks the salesman and starts to leave, but as he reaches the door he pauses and turns back to the salesman. "Do you know which week two years from now the new car will arrive?"

The salesman checks his notes and tells the man that it will be two years to the exact week. The man thanks the salesman and starts out again, but upon reaching the door, he turns back again.

"Could you possibly tell me what day of the week two years from now the car will arrive?"

The salesman, mildly annoyed, checks his notes again and says that it will be exactly two years from this week, on Thursday.

Morris thanks the salesman and once again starts to leave. Halfway though the door, he hesitates, turns back, and walks up to the salesman.

"I'm sorry to be so much trouble, but do you know if that will be two years from now on Thursday in the morning, or in the afternoon?"

Visibly irritated, the salesman flips through his papers yet another time and says sharply that it will be in the afternoon, two years from now on Thursday.

"That's a relief!" says Morris. "The plumber is coming that morning!"

We often have to make plans far in advance so as to avoid any conflicts. Before making any commitments -- you know the routine -- we have to pull out the date book (or the iPhone). "The kids have got a soccer game that night at 7:00, but the next night is free." Planning ahead isn't wrong; in fact, it's a scriptural principle. What makes it wrong, though, is planning ahead without any thought of God.

"Come now, you who say, 'Today or tomorrow we will go to such and such a city, spend a year there, buy and sell, and make a profit'; whereas you do not know what will happen tomorrow. For what is your life? It is even a vapor that appears for a little time and then vanishes away. Instead, you ought to say, 'If the Lord wills, we shall live and do this or that.' " (James 4:13-15)

Go ahead! Make your plans! Fill in that date book!
Just make sure that God hasn't been left out.

From Daily Inspiration
Monday, August 8th, 2016
5:14 am
The Serenity Prayer Made Easy
Many of us struggle with what the Serenity Prayer really means. What do I control? What can I change? What does Serenity mean in any given situation? While discussing it with my wife one day, she suggested that I simplify it. She said that God already knows what I’m struggling with and what I need to let go of. God knows what I can and cannot change. So, why not let God do it?

My sponsor made it easier for me. Early in my recovery, he suggested that I make a list of everything I have total control over. Hint – it was a short list.

When I’m having a good day, just say, “God Grant me Serenity.”

And on a bad day, just say, “God …” and let God handle it.

Simple!

Bob M. (From Michel)
Sunday, August 7th, 2016
5:51 am
The Lord's Prayer
O Thou, the Breath, the Light of All
Let this Light create a heart-shrine within,
And Your Counsel rule ‘til Oneness guides all.
Grant what we need, each day, in bread and insight.
Loose the cords of mistakes binding us,
as we release the strands we hold of others’ faults.
Don’t let surface things delude us,
but keep us from unripe acts.
To You belongs the ruling mind,
the life that can act and do,
the song that beautifies all,
from age to age it renews.
In faith, I will to be true.

Translated from the Syrian Aramaic
Saturday, August 6th, 2016
6:22 am
Intuitive Guidance
Using your body as a pendulum is another tool you can use to access your higher wisdom.

Learning to trust our intuition is something that can connect us with our higher selves. Sometimes it might not seem easy to do this. Our thoughts and minds often get in the way. But by accessing our innermost self, we will find that the information we receive is usually what we truly need at that moment. One of the techniques that allows us to really get in touch with our deepest font of wisdom is using our body as a pendulum. The simple act of letting our physical being lead us in a certain direction can offer us extremely deep insights and help us find the answers we seek.

Many of us may have tried using a pendulum or crystal on a chain as a dousing tool to acquire the information we need to make decisions or even find lost objects. Using our bodies puts us much more closely in tune with our being. The process of using your body as a pendulum is to ask your higher self a question and wait for your body to respond in either a forward-tilting or backward-tilting motion. The first step is to really understand how our higher self communicates with us by centering our bodies, asking ourselves the directions for yes and no, and noting which way our body moves. For a lot of people a forward motion is yes, and your body tilting backward is a no answer. It is easier to start with simple questions at first to understand how our higher self communicates with us. As we become more used to the messages we receive and how we process them, we can start asking for more specific things such as what dosage of herbs to take or which foods would best nourish our bodies. Using this technique in the grocery store or when shopping for vitamins and remedies can be extremely helpful.

Since we are always present in our bodies, understanding how we can use our bodies as pendulums is a tool we can use at any given moment in our lives. Letting our bodies tell us what is happening inside of us will in turn help to guide us through not just daily but also major life decisions. The more we allow our bodies to open up and share with us the connection it has with our deeper self, the better able we will be to truly access the knowledge we hold so deeply within.

By Madisyn Taylor of The Daily OM
Friday, August 5th, 2016
5:06 am
Finding Peace Within
If we are to have true peace in the world, we must first find it within ourselves.

Most people agree that a more peaceful world would be an ideal situation for all living creatures. However, we often seem stumped as to how to bring this ideal situation into being. If we are to have true peace in this world, each one of us must find it in ourselves first. If we don't like ourselves, for example, we probably won't like those around us. If we are in a constant state of inner conflict, then we will probably manifest conflict in the world. If we have been fighting within our families, there can be no peace in the world. We must shine the light of inquiry on our internal struggles because this is the only place we can really create change.

When we initiate the process of looking inside ourselves for the meaning of peace, we will begin to understand why it has always been so difficult to come by. This in itself will enable us to be compassionate toward the many people in the world who find themselves caught up in conflicts both personal and universal. We may have an experience of peace that we can call up in ourselves to remind us of what we want to create, but if we are human we will also feel the pull in the opposite direction the desire to defend ourselves, to keep what we feel belongs to us, to protect our loved ones and our cherished ideals, and the anger we feel when threatened. This awareness is important because we cannot truly know peace until we understand the many tendencies and passions that threaten our ability to find it. Peace necessarily includes, even as it transcends, all of our primal energy, much of which has been expressed in ways that contradict peace.

Being at peace with ourselves is not about denying or rejecting any part of ourselves. On the contrary, in order to be at peace, we must be willing and able to hold ourselves, in all our complexity, in a full embrace that excludes nothing. This is perhaps the most difficult part for many of us because we want so much to disown the negative aspects of our humanity. Ironically, though, true peace begins with a willingness to take responsibility for our humanity so that we might ultimately transform it in the light of our love.

By Madisyn Taylor of The Daily OM
Thursday, August 4th, 2016
3:25 am
Getting Rid Of Anger And Resentment
But now is the time to get rid of anger, rage, malicious behavior, slander, and dirty language. Don't lie to each other, for you have stripped off your old evil nature and all its wicked deeds. In its place you have clothed yourselves with a brand-new nature that is continually being renewed as you learn more and more about Christ, who created this new nature within you. (from Colossians 3:8-10)(New Living Translation)


Meditation
There is a chapter entitled “Watching out for anger and resentment” in the book, “Living Sober.” This chapter is aimed at encouraging alcoholics get over these nasty qualities. The following passages are found on pages 37-40, “Hostility, resentment, anger – whatever word you use to describe this feeling – seems to have a close tie-up with intoxication and maybe even a deeper one with alcoholism. For instance, some scientists once asked a large number of alcoholic men why they got drunk, and found an important answer was ‘So I can tell somebody off.’ In other words, they felt the power and freedom while drunk to express anger they could not comfortably display when sober.
“Someone has suggested there may be a subtle, undetermined bio-chemical relationship between alcohol and the kind of body changes that accompany anger. One experimental study of alcoholics suggested that resentments create in the blood of alcoholics a certain uncomfortable condition that is cleared up by a binge. A top psychologist has recently suggested that drinkers may enjoy the feelings of power over others that the influence of alcohol can bring.
“Facts have been reported about the close correlation between drinking and assaults and homicides. It seems a large proportion of these in some countries happen when either the victim or the perpetrator (or both) is under the influence of alcohol. Rapes, domestic squabbles leading to divorce, child abuse, and armed robbery are also frequently laid at the doorstep of excessive drinking...
“Anger in all its aspects is a universal human problem. But it poses a special threat to alcoholics: Our own anger can kill us. Recovered alcoholics almost unanimously agree that hostility, grudges, or resentments often make us want to drink, so we need to be vigilant against such feelings. We have found much more satisfying ways than drinking for dealing with them...
“Interestingly, several of the methods already discussed for avoiding a drink have also worked splendidly for getting over the inner discomfort we suffer when angry. For instance, when we begin to simmer inside, it sometimes helps a great deal to take a few bites of something good to eat, or a glass of a sweetened, nonintoxicating beverage. It’s also remarkably effective, when we begin to get teed off at something, to pick up the phone and talk about it to our sponsor or to other recovered alcoholics. And it pays to pause and consider whether or not we may be overtired. If so, we’ve found that some rest often dissipates rage. Repeatedly, simply pondering ‘Live and Let Live” cools our temper. Or we may shift quickly to an activity that has nothing to do with the source of our anger... For many of us, contemplating the ideas of the Serenity Prayer blows away our hostility. Often, whatever we are mad about turns out to be something we cannot possibly control or change...”

Prayer
God, help me to be rid of anger and resentment. Help me to show the love of Jesus Christ to all I meet.

From Roger Baron
Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016
5:26 am
Intuitive Guidance From Within
Using your body as a pendulum is another tool you can use to access your higher wisdom.

Learning to trust our intuition is something that can connect us with our higher selves. Sometimes it might not seem easy to do this. Our thoughts and minds often get in the way. But by accessing our innermost self, we will find that the information we receive is usually what we truly need at that moment. One of the techniques that allows us to really get in touch with our deepest font of wisdom is using our body as a pendulum. The simple act of letting our physical being lead us in a certain direction can offer us extremely deep insights and help us find the answers we seek.

Many of us may have tried using a pendulum or crystal on a chain as a dousing tool to acquire the information we need to make decisions or even find lost objects. Using our bodies puts us much more closely in tune with our being. The process of using your body as a pendulum is to ask your higher self a question and wait for your body to respond in either a forward-tilting or backward-tilting motion. The first step is to really understand how our higher self communicates with us by centering our bodies, asking ourselves the directions for yes and no, and noting which way our body moves. For a lot of people a forward motion is yes, and your body tilting backward is a no answer. It is easier to start with simple questions at first to understand how our higher self communicates with us. As we become more used to the messages we receive and how we process them, we can start asking for more specific things such as what dosage of herbs to take or which foods would best nourish our bodies. Using this technique in the grocery store or when shopping for vitamins and remedies can be extremely helpful.

Since we are always present in our bodies, understanding how we can use our bodies as pendulums is a tool we can use at any given moment in our lives. Letting our bodies tell us what is happening inside of us will in turn help to guide us through not just daily but also major life decisions. The more we allow our bodies to open up and share with us the connection it has with our deeper self, the better able we will be to truly access the knowledge we hold so deeply within.

By Madisyn Taylor of The Daily OM
Tuesday, August 2nd, 2016
1:52 am
5 Spiritual Tools For Coping With Brain Fog
It’s like trying to think through a soupy fog so thick you can’t see anything ahead of you. It makes you feel as if you’re moving in slow motion. It causes you to second-guess your contribution to conversations, work, or just basic daily activities such as putting the coffee pot together in the morning. It’s brain fog, and it often arises as part of the array of symptoms brought on by some chronic illnesses or medications, including chemotherapy. As you consult with your doctor about the physical and medical aspects of brain fog, here are some spiritual tools to help you cope:

Reassure. Especially when you first experience it, brain fog can be scary. Your medical team can rule out any potential, other possibilities, and help you understand your symptoms. Then, when you feel brain fog rise and you begin to fear again, revisit that place of reassurance and use it to reinforce the strong sense of support and comfort holding you up.

Respect. If you have a chronic illness, or have just endured a long journey through cancer, your body has been challenged in ways that you might not be able to fully understand. It is only human to become frustrated or even angry that you’re not back to “100 percent,” but even more beneficial is to respect that you need extra spiritual care now, and apply that sense of respect to how you react when brain fog occurs.

Relate. Those around you might react adversely to your bouts of brain fog. They might wonder if you are unable to function or are falling into dementia, and their attitudes toward you might hurt your sensitive spirit. Pray for words to communicate clearly what is happening to you, and ask those who care to be patient as you cope with this frustrating symptom. Surround yourself with those who can and do understand, and protect yourself from those who refuse.

Relax. Brain fog symptoms can become more pronounced when you are under stress. When you feel yourself tensing, be kind to yourself and allow yourself breathing room – slow down, meditate on relaxing in a place that is unhurried and supportive, and pray for comfort to flood your soul.

Reshape. Brain fog can make you feel weak and vulnerable, unsure of how God could continue to work if you are so muddle-headed. You can reshape your spiritual seeking by praying for and meditating on good things, especially wisdom, strength and patience. Changing your prayer focus can, in turn, modify your reaction to episodes of brain fog, and give you more courage to weather them well.

From Belief Net
[ << Previous 20 ]
About LiveJournal.com